Fulfilling a longing for space, seasons and a different cadence of life

Rick+Laura-January 20, 2015SMA number of years ago, when professional videographers Rick and Laura Betancourt left their home in southern California (they call it “So-Cal”) and headed to Ireland for a much anticipated vacation of scenic sightseeing, they couldn’t foresee that the trip would lead them to move to St. George, Maine.

“In Ireland we met a couple from upstate New York who afterwards invited us to come to their home for a visit,” Rick explains. “We arrived in autumn and were stunned by the beauty of the fall colors. We found we loved the northeast.”

After a number of further trips to the region, the Betancourts zeroed in on coastal Maine. “Being from the Los Angeles area, we like the coast,” Rick says. But what they didn’t like about southern California, he adds, was the intensity of suburban life there.

“We wanted space. We wanted to adjust the cadence of our lives, we wanted seasons. In southern California you’re so plugged in—it’s an engine working you to pieces.”

Luckily for the Betancourts, they could bring their videography business, Carolwood Productions, to Maine with them.  “We’ve always worked out of the home,” Laura says. And they have been able to continue working with clients in southern California as they transition to grounding their business in Maine.

“Maine is a great location for us,” Rick says, noting that the couple brings 18 years of experience to wedding, event, and corporate cinematography. “This is a popular destination for events and weddings and there is so much more variety to the environment here than in So-Cal.”

The Betancourts both have strong art and graphic design backgrounds and training. “We met in college during a representational drawing class. The instructor, acting as Cupid, told Laura, ‘Hey… go check out that guy’s work over there!’ It was love at first sight. We got married—and we’re still working together!”

From there, Rick’s path diverted into the business world, working in a fast-paced, corporate environment, and Laura added strong writing skills to her resume, eventually becoming a blog manager for a couple of wedding and fine dining websites.

“We launched Carolwood Productions full-time in 2006, combining our love for the creative, with solid business understanding so we could create effective media content for our clients,” Rick says.

The company’s name is a tribute to Walt Disney, who lived on Carolwood Drive in Homby Hills, Calif. “I’ve always been a fan of things Disney,” notes Rick on the Carolwood website. Rick also shared Disney’s love of steam-powered trains. In the early 1950s Walt Disney operated at his home a 1/8 scale live steam railroad that he called The Carolwood Pacific Railroad.

Producing effective videos for clients, particularly for corporate clients, the Betancourts stress, requires much more than technical skill. “It all starts with a script,” Rick says categorically. “That becomes the bible we follow. It puts everyone on the same page and allows us to get in on the planning stage for the production. We get to do a lot of problem-solving about how best to get an idea across.”

But making successful videos for weddings and other events involves special challenges. “Wedding videographers are among the most bullet-proof people on earth,” Rick laughs. “To make a 90-minute movie, we are both shooting a 15-hour day.”

“And there are no re-shoots!” Laura interjects, adding, “And sometimes you run into adverse situations, with lots of people running around as you are trying to shoot or poor weather conditions.”

“You’ve got to make the couple look beautiful and make the venue look beautiful,” Rick says. “You’ve also got to keep focused on what the couple wants. But if you’ve got the right mindset and come prepared you’ll be in good shape.”

The Betancourts moved into their home on Route 131 in Martinsville on Memorial Day weekend last year. To celebrate their first few months on the peninsula they put together a short video titled “Summertime in St. George, Maine,” that appears in the “Recent Projects” section of the Carolwood website. “It is really just a postcard for the people we know who have been curious about what St. George is like,” Rick says. Recently, they added another video of St. George in winter using a drone-mounted camera.

Asked what the couple likes best so far about living in St. George, Laura takes a moment to decide and then says, “The friendliness of the people. In southern California life is so hectic and busy you don’t get to know people.”

Rick nods in agreement. “Folks here seem genuine, they seem real.” After a pause, he adds with a wry smile, “And now maybe, just maybe, we can slow down and get back to an eight-hour work day.” —JW

 To learn more about Carolwood Productions visit carolwoodproductions.com or call 207-242-3264.

PHOTO: Courtesy Carolwood Productions

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Loving to drive even when speed is not the key

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADriving an ambulance is nothing like driving a race car, but in 2008 his love of racing is what led Christopher Milton-Hall to ask St. George paramedic Candy Davis if the town’s ambulance service ever needed drivers.

“I do love to drive,” Milton-Hall explains, noting that at the time he was looking for a community-minded activity to pursue in retirement. “I got to know Candy because her uncle lives next door to me and her grandparents live on the other side. One day I saw her in her paramedic uniform and I said, ‘Candy, do you guys ever need drivers?’ And she said, ‘Sure, come along!’ So I came along and that was how it started—I enjoy it thoroughly.”

Most of all, Milton-Hall says, he enjoys the people with whom he works, which includes the town’s firefighters, EMTs, paramedics and the other drivers. “It’s the comaraderie. These are good folks. I also enjoy the adrenalin of getting a call and responding—getting to the station, getting the ambulance and getting to the scene.”

In addition, there’s the satisfaction of being able to liaison with patients’ friends and family members who are standing by as the EMTs and paramedic are working. “They often need some reassurance about what is going on, about what the process is, where they go when they get to the hospital.”

Milton-Hall got started racing in the 1970s, driving open-wheel formula cars. The demands of his business career then intervened, but along about 2000 he was able to return to racing. When he retired to Spruce Head in 2003 he bought a Mazda Miata and began racing it in Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) road races.

Driving an ambulance, he readily admits, is quite different. “The key to driving an ambulance is not speed. We are allowed to violate the speed limit, but only as long as we are carrying a patient and using lights and siren—and at all times we are to be reasonable. To be honest, if you have an accident it is not a good thing to be an ambulance driver. You’re held to a pretty high standard so you’d have to really be able to prove you were not at fault.”

The real key to driving an ambulance? “Smoothness,” Milton-Hall states bluntly.

“Our EMTs and medics are supposed to be belted in as much as they can be, but it is not possible at all times, so harsh braking, abrupt acceleration and sudden turning can cause issues with patient care. We work hard to make the ride in the back as easy on the EMTs and patients as possible.” Admittedly, he adds, our local roads, both paved and unpaved, don’t always make that a simple matter, especially in winter and mud season.

But whatever the circumstances, the Association works to make sure the drivers are well prepared for their duties, Milton-Hall notes. “I started doing ride-alongs with experienced drivers, then worked up to driving under supervision and finally progressed to driving the crew and patient by myself. I also took the Ambulance Vehicle Operator Course (AVOC), which is required within six months of starting to drive an ambulance. And then I took advanced AVOC courses.”

Importantly, driving from the station to the scene and to the hospital isn’t the only thing ambulance drivers do while on a call. “We assist at the scene, grabbing necessary equipment, performing CPR if necessary, helping load the patient on the stretcher, handling the stretcher, getting it into the ambulance, and then cleaning up the ambulance at the hospital to get it ready for the next patient. We’ve had more than one instance where the ambulance has received a call while finishing up at the hospital and has had to go straight to another scene in St. George, so it’s important to have the back of the ambulance ready to go ASAP.”

An average shift is eight hours long. “A driver can expect total inconsistency from shift to shift,” Milton-Hall says with a laugh. “Sometimes they spend the entire eight hours answering calls but other times there are no calls at all.” Some of the town’s ambulance drivers work full-time while others are retired or work part time. Drivers agree to remain within town limits (at home or elsewhere) during their shift.

In addition to being a volunteer ambulance driver, Milton-Hall was recently elected to the Association’s Executive Committee. Right now he is focusing on recruiting new drivers. “With our paid paramedics and volunteer EMTs we are in good shape to answer calls, but we are less well-staffed with drivers. If an EMT has to drive the ambulance during a call that means patient care can suffer. Just three to five new drivers would make a big difference.”

Loving to drive, Milton-Hall adds wryly, is a good qualification for the job.

Persons interested in volunteering to be ambulance drivers should contact the St. George Volunteer Firefighters and Ambulance Association at 372-6122 for more information. The only requirements are that you have a clean driving record and are reasonably physically fit. —JW

PHOTO: Julie Wortman

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School and all that snow!

The seventh grade on the roof

The seventh grade on the roof

This has been the coldest winter since 1926, according to the Bangor Daily News. In 1995-1996 there was a record of 108 inches of snow. This year that record was broken with 118+ inches of snow!

With all the snow we’ve had this year, St. George School has had a total of 10 snow days off from school so far. We have five built into our schedule, but we have to make the other five snow days up. Some ideas the RSU #13 administrative team had were to shorten our April vacation, or lengthen school days. Another idea was to ask the state for a waiver to forgive a few student days, and have teachers work extra after school is out. Some states are providing “Snow Packets” of work kids can do at home when school is cancelled. Recently, it was decided that we would go to school  on a few Saturdays (March 28, April 11, May 9, and May 16) to make up the snow days.

Before we had all this snow, the 7th grade class read the book Blizzard by Jim Murphy. It’s about the Great Blizzard of 1888. Our English Language Arts teacher, Mrs. Schmanska, thinks we jinxed the weather by reading the book.

We also read To Build A Fire by Jack London. The setting of the book is in the Yukon, in the early 1900s. It’s during winter, and the temperatures are -50 degrees and below! A man and a dog are headed to camp; but will they make it?

We also did projects about snowflakes in science class. (Now it’s time to study something springy!)

I asked some of the 1st graders what they think about having all this snow, and this is what one of them said: “I like sledding down hills, but I like summer more.” I also asked a group of girls. They said, “We like winter, but it’s cold. We also like building snowmen, like Olaf from Frozen.”
The 4th graders have recently been writing haikus about winter. Here are some written by John Campbell:

The wind is howling
Lots of snow hitting my face
I can’t really see

It is really cold
I’m speeding fast on the ice
I love ice skating

Snowmen, forts what fun!
But now I’m getting chilly
So now hot cocoa!

—Sophia Campbell (Campbell is a 7th grade student at the St. George School.)

PHOTO: Josh McPhail

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Applications for ‘First Work Program’ due April 17

Herring Gut is now accepting applications for the First Work Experience program.  This program is a summer work experience for local teens. Teens will learn to be responsible employees while earning money at the Herring Gut campus in Port Clyde. Eligible teens must be between the ages of 13 and 15 and either go to school in RSU #13 or live in the district.

Throughout the summer, teens will work in the gardens planting, weeding, and harvesting vegetables as well as maintaining our aquaponics greenhouse. Once a week, teens will manage a farmstand at the Ocean View Grange Farmers Market to sell the vegetables they grow. They will also provide public tours of our aquaponics greenhouse. Teens will be introduced to topics ranging from sustainable food sources, gardening techniques, responsible money management, and how to search for a job after this program is finished.

Sessions are four weeks in length, two half days (3 hours) per week (Tuesdays and Thursdays), during the months of July and August. Workers are paid a stipend of $200 (minus taxes) at the end of their session.

Applications are due April 17.

Please visit www.herringgut.org for more information and to download an application or contact Alex Brasili at 207-372-8677 or email her.

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March Madness: Mussel Ridge Hoops!

Thomaston and Medomak Valley boys get ready to play

Thomaston and Medomak Valley boys get ready to play

At first blush, a three-day basketball tournament for 4th-grade boys and girls may not sound like it would be a major event in the life of a community, but for St. George the annual Mussel Ridge Hoops Tournament is a very big deal, involving dozens of volunteers, drawing teams from throughout the midcoast region and commanding a high level of excitement and enjoyment.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThis year was the event’s 20th tournament, making it one of the first tournaments of its kind aimed at this younger age group. “The St. George School has a perfect facility for the younger kids,” says Ben Vail, director of Parks and Recreation for the town. “We’ve got an elementary school-size gym which is perfect for these younger girls and boys. Older kids need more space.”

The Mussel Ridge Hoops Tournament is a “double elimination” tournament, which means that a team keeps playing until they’ve lost twice. “This guarantees that every team that comes down here plays at least twice,” Vail says, a factor that enhances teams’ ability to truly enter into the event. The fact that the referees are board-certified, he adds, lends an air of professionalism that also means a lot to the players.

“One of the best dynamics I watch is that toward the end of the day you see kids from different teams hanging out talking between games and meeting people that some day down the road may become friends and may end up being future classmates,” Vail says.

Stephanie Simmons and daughter Emma staff the ticket table

Stephanie Simmons and daughter Emma staff the ticket table

There are modest admission fees and lots of food available, much of it homemade specialties donated by St. George parents and other residents. Local businesses buy ads in the commemorative program and make other donations. “All the money that is taken in goes to the St. George Recreation Boosters, which is set up to support children’s recreation—this is the Boosters’ major fundraiser.” Vail says. While the town’s budget supplies “the basics,” he goes on to explain, the boosters help the Parks and Recreation Department make improvements to existing facilities, such as new, safer playground equipment for places like Collins Park in Port Clyde.

Volunteers Autumn Miller and Allison Gill serve up some delicious treats to Hunter Hoppe

Volunteers Autumn Miller and Allison Gill serve up some delicious treats to Hunter Hoppe

Although much of the enjoyment people get from the Mussel Ridge Hoops Tournament has to do with the fun of seeing these delightful younger players “having a ball,” Vail believes the event is also a real source of justifiable community pride. “I enjoyed the tournament as a spectator when my son played in it, but now that I’m seeing it from the inside I’m blown away—we have people here willingly spending hours and hours of their time all weekend long, serving food, cleaning up. You expect that people who have children in the tournament will volunteer, but we have people volunteering who have no stake at all. They could easily be off ice fishing, but they’re spending their time at the tournament.” —JW

 

PHOTOS: Julie Wortman

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Where in St. George…?

WhereDo you know where this is? Send your answer to betsy@stgeorgedragon.com. The first correct answer wins a free business card-sized ad in The Dragon. Nobody identified the galamander wheel across from the ball field on Port Clyde Road in the February 12  issue of The Dragon. Was it too obvious?

 

 

PHOTO: Betsy Welch

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Pictorial: February 20, 2015 in St. George

Here is a feature especially for our readers who are not here with us at the moment… we wanted you to see what you’ve been missing. We seized the opportunity on a day with bright sun, strong winds and a high of about 18 degrees. Enjoy!

No, the Monhegan Boat Line ticket office is not open. But you can get hot coffee at the General Store.

No, the Monhegan Boat Line ticket office is not open. But you can get hot coffee at the General Store.

Dining on the deck is not an option.

Dining on the deck is not an option.

Icebergs at the launching ramp

Icebergs at the launching ramp

A quiet morning in Port Clyde

A quiet morning in Port Clyde

It's on Factory Road. Get there before it's gone.

It’s on Factory Road. Get there before it’s gone.

Too windy to linger long

Too windy to linger long

No parking available today

No parking available today

The Hedgerow Market won't be opening any time soon...

The Hedgerow Market won’t be opening any time soon…

... but things are growing behind the scenes in the greenhouse!

… but things are growing behind the scenes in the greenhouse!

Battle is much more difficult in the snow

Battle is much more difficult in the snow

The Town Office parking lot is in good shape

The Town Office parking lot is in good shape

And it's warm and friendly inside!

And it’s warm and friendly inside!

Stonefish seems nearly buried

Stonefish seems nearly buried

The Quarry Tavern at the Eastwind Inn ready to offer hospitality on the weekend

The Quarry Tavern at the Eastwind Inn ready to offer hospitality on the weekend

The tricky corner at the post office in Tenants Harbor

The tricky corner at the post office in Tenants Harbor

More icebergs at the Tenants Harbor Boatyard

More icebergs at the Tenants Harbor Boatyard

Dog walking is hazardous

Dog walking is hazardous

Clark Island Road

Clark Island Road

It's Burger Night at the Craignair Inn tonight!

It’s Burger Night at the Craignair Inn tonight!

Cheerful waves at the General Store

Cheerful waves at the General Store

Running out of places to put the snow

Running out of places to put the snow

The library is one windy spot!

The library is one windy spot!

There should be an icicle competition

There should be an icicle competition

George is open for business!

George is open for business!

They know how to push stuff around at the Transfer Station

They know how to push stuff around at the Transfer Station

More due tomorrow. Can't wait.

More due tomorrow. Can’t wait.

PHOTOS: Betsy Welch

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An award-winning—and lifelong—focus on kids’ well-being

L-R: Adrienne Gallant, Let’s Go! Knox County Coordinator, and Dawn Gauthier and Beth Vanorse of Ponderosa Playland

L-R: Adrienne Gallant, Let’s Go! Knox County Coordinator, and Dawn Gauthier and Beth Vanorse of Ponderosa Playland

For many folks, a birthday celebrated without cake is hard to imagine. But for Dawn Gauthier, director and owner of Ponderosa Playland, the only in-home child daycare facility located in St. George, birthdays and cake lost their inevitable association more than two years ago. That’s when she learned about the Let’s Go! 5-2-1-0 program at a food education program held at the Penquis center in Rockland. The program involves a discipline of daily providing children with at least five fruits or vegetables, two hours or less of screen time, one hour of active play and zero sugary drinks.

Gauthier is the first winner of Let’s Go! Knox County’s Redy Award, which honors “outstanding commitment, leadership and innovation” to the 5-2-1-0 program. “We don’t provide sugary treats ever,” Gauthier states bluntly, noting that she supplies her charges with a breakfast snack, lunch and afternoon snack five days a week. “It’s really not hard to do healthy celebrations or to feed kids healthy food daily.”

Gauthier has been focused on the well-being of the children in her care since high school. “I love kids! I think it began when my sister was born. She’s 15 years younger and I enjoyed being one of her caregivers. During high school I also worked for a daycare center.”

Twenty eight years later she’s still providing daycare services for children as young as four months and as old as 10. Eighteen years ago, when her second son was born, she began providing daycare in her home. “It was the easiest way to raise a family and keep working,” she explains.

Another reason an in-home daycare operation made sense was the home’s location. “I grew up in South Portland, but my grandparents lived here on 100 acres of land called the Ponderosa. I spent all my spare time here and in 1996 was able to put in this house across the drive from my grandparents. It’s a perfect location for childcare—we’re a good distance off the main (Wallston) road, which means we don’t have to be fenced in. Our kids have lots of places to explore.” She cites a frog pond and a field across from the house which is great for flying kites in summer or sledding in winter.

Gauthier gets valuable help in running her daycare center from teacher Beth Vanorse, who has a degree in early childhood education. In addition to basic caregiving tasks, the two carry out a pre-school education program each day. “I love being involved in each child’s early development,” Gauthier says.

Gauthier admits that as much as she enjoys her work, “no one chooses daycare because it’s easy. Five days a week working with kids all day is tough.” There are also the requirements that go along with maintaining her license to operate—these involve continuing education, trainings and meeting the state’s health and safety standards. The benefits of such requirements for the children, however, are enormous. Learning of the Let’s Go! 5-2-1-0 program is a case in point.

Dawn Gauthier and Playland pre-schooler Will

Dawn Gauthier and Playland pre-schooler Will

“It’s just about awareness,” Gauthier says. The day she learned about the program at Penquis she stopped serving juice and began encouraging the children in her care to drink more water. “We spend a lot of time looking for healthy food choices. And we try to be as creative as we can about indoor active play when the temperature outside is below 20 degrees, preventing us from being able to take the kids outside.” Dance parties, yoga and having the children leap from activity mat to activity mat are some of the solutions Gauthier and Vanorse have devised for this winter problem. They also get useful ideas from Mailbox Magazine, a publication for teachers.

Gauthier says she’s pleased to have received the Redy Award for her participation in the Let’s Go! program, but notes that “We’re not doing it for the recognition. It’s just the right thing to do.” —JW

Let’s Go! is a nationally recognized childhood obesity prevention program that reaches children and families where they live, learn, work and play. Let’s Go! is committed to changing environments and policies at childcare sites, schools, out-of-school programs, healthcare practices, workplaces and communities. The Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital at Maine Medical Center and collaboration across health systems and community health coalitions contribute to the program’s success in Maine. Contact Adrienne Gallant at 207-921-8951 to learn more about Let’s Go! 5-2-1-0.

PHOTOS: Top, Pen Bay Healthcare; bottom, Julie Wortman

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Rector: ‘Graying of Maine’ a big problem

Chris Rector

Chris Rector

At the January 13 meeting of the St. George Business Alliance (SGBA), small business owner and former Maine state senator Chris Rector, who now serves as one of seven regional representatives for Senator Angus King, told the group’s members that how Maine addresses workforce development will be a key factor in whether the state thrives economically.

“The biggest challenge is the demographics,” he said. “We need younger workers, we need immigrants. Businesses considering moving to Maine look at our workforce and say, ‘Who will be available to work for us in 10 or 15 years?’ The graying of Maine is a big problem.”

Karen Brace of the Penobscot Bay Regional Chamber of Commerce (of which the SGBA is now a member) seconded Rector’s comment, noting that a related issue frequently brought up by the Chamber’s members is the need for more housing that a younger workforce can afford.

Rector said his job is to be King’s “eyes and ears” in this region. “I regard spending time with a group like yours as an opportunity to open lines of communication.” In many ways, he said, a peninsula like St. George is like an island. “Each peninsula has its own characteristics of culture,” stressing the importance of recognizing such distinctions.

Although Rector spends much of his time traveling his assigned region, he has an office in Augusta at 4 Gabriel Drive and can be reached at 622-8292 or Chris_Rector@king.senate.gov.

The January SGBA meeting took place at The Point restaurant in Tenants Harbor, owned by owner/chef Jessica Beal. —JW

PHOTO: Diane Hall

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Gill wins St. George School geography bee

Runner-up Anna Kingsbury, left, and winner Allison Gill with Mr. McPhail

Runner-up Anna Kingsbury, left, and winner Allison Gill with Mr. McPhail

Recently, at St. George School, we had a geography bee. The winner was 5th grade student Allison Gill and the runner-up was 5th grade student Anna Kingsbury.

The geography bee is for students in grades 4-8. The way you get into the school’s geography bee is that each grade has a classroom bee, and the two winners from each grade go to the school geography bee. Sometimes there is a tie so there may be more, but it’s usually 10-12 contestants in the final bee, which is held in the gym in front of the public. Geography teacher Mr. McPhail is the Bee Master.

This year, the winners of the classroom bees were: from 4th grade—Jack Elwell and Gregory Murry; from 5th grade—Anna Kingsbury, Audrey Leavitt and Alison Gill; from 6th grade—Sam Miller and Ethan Carballo; from 7th grade—Greta Carlson and Connor Adams; and from 8th grade, (Alt. Ed.), Lucien Marriner.

We asked Mr. McPhail, our social studies teacher and the master of the classroom and school bees, what the school’s highest achievements were in the state bee. He said, “Our highest placement was fourth in the state. We’ve had at least 10 qualify for the state bee. The state bee questions are very difficult!”

Good luck to Allison Gill, who will now take a test to see if she qualifies for the state bee.

—Sophia Campbell (Campbell is a 7th grade student at the St. George School.)

PHOTO: Alison England

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Winter sports in St. George

boysbballSMAt St. George School, the town’s recreation department offers basketball for grades K-6, adult basketball, and skiing for all ages. According to Mr. Vail, the town’s Recreation Director, community members volunteer to supervise adult basketball, coach and referee basketball for young people and keep the book and clock at games. We also have volunteers who are in charge of tickets at the Camden Snow Bowl.

K-2 basketball runs for four Saturdays in January. They generally have 20 boys and girls attend each week. Grade 3-4 basketball runs from December to the first of February. They play in a league with Thomaston and Cushing. This year we had 11 boys and 12 girls.

In addition to what the town recreation league offers, we have school teams for the older kids. We have one girls’ 7th grade basketball team, and one boys’ 7th grade team. The coach for the girls’ team was Brittany Anthony, and the coach for the boys team was Dave Banda. Karizma Chickering, Sadie Davis, Josie Mathiau, and Chloe Simmons were the four players from St. George on the girls’ team, and the rest were from Thomaston. Hunter Hoppe, Jake Paulsen, Drew Minery, Aaron Benner, Cameron Kingsbury, Jonah Carlson, and Hunter Yattaw were the players from St. George on the boys’ team, and the rest were from Thomaston.

The boys had 6 wins and 6 losses in the regular season, and 1 win and 1 loss in playoffs. The girls had 3 wins, and 9 losses in the regular season, and 1 loss in the playoffs.

The highlights of the season for the boys were that, in the first game against Camden, Drew Minery had 5 three-pointers, one to take the lead with about 10 seconds left and in a game against Rockland Hunter Hoppe was the second highest scorer. In addition, Aaron Benner scored 18 points in a game, and Cameron Kingsbury scored 27 points in a game.

According to Coach Brittany Anthony, the highlights for the girls were: “Winning against Oceanside Blue for our first win of the season! Chloe Simmons being our top scorer with 155 points, and Lindsey Brooks being top foul shooter with 63 percent at the foul line!”

For non-team sports at St. George, there is also a special “Ski-For-Free” program for St. George fourth graders happening now at the Camden Snow Bowl on Wednesdays for four weeks. It is for all fourth graders in Knox County. It’s free! They can learn to ski or snowboard. They had their first trip up there on February 4 and it was a great success. We’ve also had Learn-to-Skate opportunities at the Mid-Coast Recreation Center in Rockport, and we hope to have many more individual and group winter activities at St. George School in the future.

—Chloe Simmons (Simmons is a 7th grade student at the St. George School.)

PHOTO: Shasta Minery

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