Celebrating completion of the Keeper’s Barn and Workshop at the Marshall Point Lighthouse

Members of the Lighthouse Committee attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony on August 28. From left to right: Dave Percival, Laura Betancourt, Joan Duffy, Diana Bolton, Nat Lyon, Jan Gaudio, Craig Parsons, Lynne Hall, Lorraine Hupper, Mark Bartholomew

Members of the Lighthouse Committee attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony on August 28. From left to right: Dave Percival, Laura Betancourt, Joan Duffy, Diana Bolton, Nat Lyon, Jan Gaudio, Craig Parsons, Lynne Hall, Lorraine Hupper, Mark Bartholomew

On Wednesday, August 28, 2019, Marshall Point Lighthouse and Museum celebrated the completion of the reproduction Keeper’s Barn and Workshop with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Many community representatives, journalists, donors and lighthouse volunteers gathered for the historic moment.

The original barn was built about the turn of the 20th century and served as storage and work space for the lighthouse keepers. Several of the keepers used the barn as a secondary means of support. Shoemaking and lobster-trap building were among the occupations practiced in the Keeper’s Barn and Workshop. The Coast Guard removed the old barn in 1971, when the light became automated, no longer requiring a keeper.

The Lighthouse Committee wishes to thank everyone for their generous donations of time and money which made successful completion of this project possible. It was a true community effort. Port Clyde pastor, Randall Thissell helped in consultations with the Maine Historic Preservation Commission. Local builder Paul Gill, who at one time lived in the keeper’s house with his family, led the crew that built the beautiful post-and-beam barn. Jay Cook of Tenants Harbor provided the stone foundation work, using granite from the old Wildcat Quarry. Local builder Steve Thomas, former host of “This Old House” on PBS, donated time for a fundraising event. The support of many local businesses, artists, organizations, residents, visitors and lighthouse lovers helped us meet the challenge of raising the $150,000 needed.

The barn will allow consolidation of artifacts in one place, making rotation of exhibits easier. Come by and see the outstanding workmanship of our newest addition to the campus. And watch for some of the additional projects in the works, like a webcam, and the return of the Marshall Point 5th Order Fresnel lens, which has been at the Lighthouse Museum in Rockland.
—Laura Betancourt

PHOTOS: Top, Sean Fowlds, bottom, Carolwood Productions

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